Mueller testimony pushed back a week to July 24

Planning for former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s highly anticipated testimony was thrown into disarray Friday as multiple sources said the hearing was delayed amid a “breakdown in negotiations” — yet others indicated it could still go forward next week as planned.Internal talks over the structure of the hearings originally scheduled for July 17 have been heating up for days, with some members complaining they might not have enough time carved out to ask questions.Sources said Friday morning the hearings will be pushed back to July 24. A senior source said there was a “breakdown in negotiations” to have Mueller appear.Yet the Democratic majority on the House Judiciary Committee maintained: “At this moment we still plan to have our hearing on the 17th and we will let you know if that changes.”Mueller, who investigated Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and issued a report finding no evidence of collusion with President Trump, has been scheduled to testify before both the Judiciary and Intelligence committees after being subpoenaed by the panels last month.Mueller was slated to testify in public before the Judiciary Committee for two hours or more, followed by another two hours-plus of testimony before the House Intelligence Committee in an open setting.But some lawmakers complained this wouldn’t give them enough time for questions.And there were conflicting details over plans for a subsequent private session. One source told Fox News this week that the Democrats plan to have Mueller testify behind closed doors–yet it remained unclear whether Mueller himself would participate in that setting, or if his deputies would answer questions instead.House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., has said that the closed-door session would only be with the special counsel’s staff, but House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., left the door open to the possibility that Mueller could testify privately as well. It also remains unclear whether the two committees would hold a joint closed-door session or two separate ones.
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