John Wall ‘Still Crazy Good’ in Scrimmages, Says Wizards Teammate Isaac Bonga

Washington Wizards guard John Wall works out prior to an NBA basketball game against the Milwaukee Bucks, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

Nick Wass/Associated Press

At least one member of the Washington Wizards is very encouraged by what he has seen from John Wall in the guard’s recovery from a ruptured Achilles tendon. 

Appearing on the Wizards Talk podcast (h/t NBC Sports Washington’s Chase Hughes), Washington forward Isaac Bonga said Wall was “still crazy good” in scrimmages that the team was having before the NBA suspended activities because of the coronavirus pandemic. 

“People don’t get it,” Bonga continued. “Seeing John… with us and [with] G League [players]. It’s like, man, he cannot wait. He legit can’t wait to be back out there. That’s what he be showing every day out there. It’s crazy,” Bonga said.

Hughes tweeted a video of Wall scrimmaging with his teammates in January:

Chase Hughes @ChaseHughesNBCS

John Wall is playing in a full-court scrimmage getting buckets. https://t.co/JMIMisfEnw

Wall hasn’t played in a game since Dec. 26, 2018, when he initially suffered an injury to his left heel. The five-time All-Star had surgery in February 2019 to repair his Achilles tendon that ruptured when he fell at his home. 

Even though the Wizards are among the 22 teams that will take part in the NBA’s season restart in Orlando, Wall told Kevin Sheehan of The Team 980 (h/t HoopsHype) he won’t play until the 2020-21 season. 

“I won’t play at all,” he said. “I’ll wait until next season. That decision has already been made. So, no, I’m not [playing].”

The Wizards signed Wall to a four-year, $171 million extension in July 2017 that kicked in this season. He is owed $85.5 million over the next two seasons and has a $47.4 million player option in 2022-23. 

Wall was named to the All-Star team five straight times from 2014 to 2018. He was averaging 20.7 points and 8.7 assists per game during the 2018-19 season before getting injured. 

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