House Democrats push huge jobs project in wake of coronavirus | TheHill

House Democratic leaders are racing ahead with plans to craft another round of massive coronavirus relief, promoting a huge job-creation package despite growing objections from Republicans wary of piling costs atop an already unprecedented stimulus effort.

The Democrats’ nascent legislation aims to fill voids in the first three massive coronavirus bills, providing new funding for hard-hit states; ensuring that medical providers have ample supplies; and expanding paid leave for home-bound workers.

Yet the central thrust of the emerging legislation will be an enormous boost in infrastructure funding, designed both to create jobs amid the economic downturn and bolster the nation’s health, transportation, broadband and education systems — networks exposed as woefully insufficient, the Democrats argue, by the swift-moving pandemic.

“We need to invest in our infrastructure to address some of the critical impacts and vulnerabilities in America that have been laid bare by the coronavirus,” Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: White House projects grim death toll from coronavirus | Trump warns of ‘painful’ weeks ahead | US surpasses China in official virus deaths | CDC says 25 percent of cases never show symptoms 14 things to know for today about coronavirus Hillicon Valley: Trump, telecom executives talk coronavirus response | Pelosi pushes funding for mail-in voting | New York AG wants probe into firing of Amazon worker | Marriott hit by another massive breach MORE (D-Calif.) said Wednesday on a phone call with reporters. “We can create millions of good-paying jobs building the infrastructure and by strengthening commerce and reducing air pollution that harms the public health.”

The ultimate size of the Democrats’ bill remains unclear. But the still-evolving legislation will build on a $760 billion infrastructure proposal unveiled by the Democrats in January, which features new funding for roads, high-speed rail, airports and broadband networks around the country.

Specific to the current coronavirus crisis, Democrats are also adding $10 billion for community health centers and increased funds for broadband, with additional boosts in education and housing coffers to be announced in the coming days.

“Make no mistake, this is an incredible economic blow to America,” said Rep. Peter DeFazioPeter Anthony DeFazioHouse Democrats eyeing much broader Phase 3 stimulus Hillicon Valley: HHS hit by cyberattack amid coronavirus outbreak | Senators urge FCC to shore up internet access for students | Sanders ramps up Facebook ad spending | Dems ask DHS to delay Real ID deadline Top Transportation Dem warns airlines could face financial hit ‘worse than 9/11’ MORE (D-Ore), chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. “What we’ve done [already] has mitigated some of that damage, but we’re going to need a longer-term recovery package and we have to be more resilient in the future.”

The Democrats’ pitch got a huge boost on Tuesday, when President TrumpDonald John TrumpIllinois governor says state has gotten 10 percent of medical equipments it’s requested Biden leads Trump by 6 points in national poll Tesla offers ventilators free of cost to hospitals, Musk says MORE — who had won the White House on vows to adopt sweeping public works improvements — promoted a $2 trillion infrastructure package as the next phase of coronavirus response.

Yet a growing number of Republicans — including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care: White House projects grim death toll from coronavirus | Trump warns of ‘painful’ weeks ahead | US surpasses China in official virus deaths | CDC says 25 percent of cases never show symptoms 14 things to know for today about coronavirus Trump says he wouldn’t have acted differently on coronavirus without impeachment MORE (Ky.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyOn The Money: Infrastructure bill gains new steam as coronavirus worsens | Trump officials detail new small-business loan program | Outbreak poses threat to mortgage industry Infrastructure bill gains new steam as coronavirus worsens Trump backs infrastructure bill as next phase of coronavirus relief MORE (Calif.) — have been cold to the idea that more action is needed, arguing that Congress should wait to see the effect of the $2 trillion relief package, enacted just last Friday, before charging ahead with another round of emergency aid.

“Number one, I’m not interested in any more of Speaker Pelosi’s spending porn — or any other member of Congress, for that matter,” Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) said Wednesday on an interview with Fox News. “Number two, we just spent, with the leverage, $4 trillion. We ought to see if it works.”

Democrats are rejecting that argument, noting that Republicans adopted a $1.5 trillion tax cut amid a healthy economy during Trump’s first years in office.

“This is investment, this is capital. We can justify this more than tax cuts, we can justify this even more than some of the mitigation we did in [phase three],” DeFazio said. “The multiplier effect is extraordinary.”

Read More