Coronavirus patients report feeling a ‘fizzing’ and ‘buzzing’ sensation underneath and on their skin

Coronavirus patients report feeling a ‘fizzing’ and ‘buzzing’ sensation underneath and on their skin

  • Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo movement, had taken to Twitter to share that her partner had ‘sensitive skin’ that felt like it was ‘burning’ 
  • ‘We literally used aloe gel for sunburn to soothe it,’ she added. ‘The NP (nurse practitioner) later told us she had heard others say that too’ 
  • The variation of the symptom has been deemed ‘fizzing’ or ‘buzzing’ by various other folks on Twitter 
  • Symptom is not that common, according to doctors, but may be part of the body’s response in trying to recover from coronavirus 
  • Learn more about how to help people impacted by COVID

By Matthew Wright For Dailymail.com

Published: | Updated:

Coronavirus victims have taken to social media to share a variety of different symptoms they’ve experienced while fighting the virus. 

And some are describing a more peculiar ‘buzzing’ or ‘fizzing’ sensation that doctors say could be a patient’s body fighting off the infectious disease. 

Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo movement, had taken to Twitter on Thursday to share that her partner – who had tested positive for COVID-19 – had had ‘sensitive skin’ that felt like it was ‘burning.’ 

‘We literally used aloe gel for sunburn to soothe it,’ she added in a detail thread on Twitter. ‘The NP (nurse practitioner) later told us she had heard others say that too.’

#MeToo founder Tarana Burke shared that her partner had the symptoms commonly associated with the virus, but noted that they hadn’t heard of one that he wound up having: ‘burning’ sensitive skin

The variation of the symptom has been deemed ‘fizzing’ or ‘buzzing’ by various other folks on Twitter. 

Most describe the feeling the sensation in various parts of their body in addition to other commonly associated symptoms of the virus. 

Some of the people who shared their experience with the buzzing insinuated that they had been feeling sick for an extended period of time, but that the sensation was a more recent development to how they were feeling. 

One woman even described the sensation as ‘like an electric feeling on my skin.’ 

The variation of the symptom has been deemed ‘fizzing’ or ‘buzzing’ by various other folks on Twitter

 Most describe the feeling the sensation in various parts of their body in addition to other commonly associated symptoms of the virus

One woman even described the sensation as ‘like an electric feeling on my skin’

The symptom is not that common, according to doctors, but may be part of the body’s response in trying to recover from the virus. 

‘Clearly it’s been identified, but we’re just not sure yet how widespread it is,’ Dr. Daniel Griffin, chief of infectious disease at ProHealth Care Associates, explained to the New York Post.  

Griffin said that he has heard of the symptom but it is not the norm for the 50 or so coronavirus patients he sees a day. 

The symptom is not that common, according to doctors, but may be part of the body’s response in trying to recover from the virus

The feeling may be the result of the ‘antibodies interfering with the way nerves work’ but it is not quite known whether this is the body’s response to the virus or the virus causing the sensation.

Dr Vipul Shah, Clinical Director at telehealth service Pack Health, shared that the sensation could still be tied to the fever.  

More than 20,000 people have died from the coronavirus

‘If people aren’t used to having fevers, maybe their skin really does feel like an electric sensation,’ he said. 

The doctor advises that aloe vera gel or mild lotion could alleviate the feeling.  

Griffin also said that the reaction could be one of post-traumatic stress after patients recover from being in the ICU or on ventilators.  

‘People are used to being sick and then in a few days being all good,’ he said. ‘This infection seems to have this tail to it — a lingering fatigue. There’s kind of a foggy, zombie-like state, where their eyes get glassy and they’re not quite as sharp.’

Griffin recommended that people just wait the symptom out and let the body recover on its own.  

More than 522,000 people have been infected with the virus

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